Covid-19: The clinic is now open and following government recommendations around hygiene and social distancing.

How to help your child talk – Tip #1 is modelling

By | Speech Pathology

How do children learn to talk? Modelling is an evidence based strategy to help slow talkers Children learn to talk by hearing other people talk. They hear all the people all around them talk. This process of listening to other people talk starts from the day they are born. Their little brains are hard wired to take in sounds and words from the very beginning. Children, from babaies to pre-schoolers, learn language from the people around them. They learn language from the people they spend the most time with. This is usually the parent. However, it can be siblings, grandparents,…

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Project ImPACT is a parent training program that equips parents with the knowledge and skills to teach their child social communication skills

Is my child’s communication developing properly?

By | Speech Pathology

Communication is a complex yet fascinating process. Speech Pathologists understand that the early years in your child’s life are a critical time for communication development. Watching your child begin to communicate, and then to become a very proficient communicator is an amazing process. All of this happens in a relatively short period of time, and it is a process that Speech Pathologist understand in great detail. For many children the development of communication is a straightforward process. However, some children take longer to talk, and some children need help to build the foundations for communication. The following checklists have been…

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When should my child be able to say ‘th’ sounds?

By | Speech Pathology

Is your child saying ‘fing’ for ‘thing’? Are they saying ‘dat’ for ‘that? The ‘th’ sound is a later developing sound. Speech Pathology Australia advises that children don’t have to able to say this sound until they are about 8 years of age. Some children can say the ‘th’ sound much earlier, some children learn it when they start school, and some children keep making this speech error. Children develop their speech sounds in a general order. This starts in their first year of life, so let’s have a look at speech sound development. Before the age of 1 year This…

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My child isn’t talking at 2 years – does it matter?

By | Speech Pathology

Most children start using their first words between 12-16 months of age. Some children started using words at 9 months. Other children start to talk at 18 months. Like everything else, children vary in the age that they start talking. Does it matter if a child isn’t talking at 2 years? When a child isn’t talking at 2 years then it’s time to take a closer look at what is happening. It helps parents to know what is ‘normal’ when they are concerned about their child’s speech and language development. Understand the difference between speech and language Speech is how clearly…

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What you should know about children’s speech development

By | Speech Pathology

Developing Clear Speech Sounds Clear speech development is very important for children. It is part of their overall communication development, is critical to their friendships, and it integral to children’s academic success. Some children learn to speak clearly very quickly. Other children take longer to learn to speak clearly, and some children will need help with their speech. Our Speech Pathologists at our Bondi Junction clinic believe that it is much better to identify any speech development issues early and resolve them early. When children first begin to speak, most children can’t say a lot of sounds clearly. This is…

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How to help your child talk tip #2 – slow down and wait

By | Speech Pathology

Why should I slow down? Babies are surrounded by so much language. They are learning to listen to that language and process it so they can do the same thing when they get older. However, the pathways in their brain are new. They can’t process speech and language as quickly as we can. Life is busy, parents are busy and children lead busier lives. When the pace of life slows, children can take in more around them. They can learn more from every experience. This includes slowing down the rate at which you speak to your child. Processing language is…

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How to help your child talk – Tip #3 is eliminate distractions

By | Speech Pathology

How do children learn to talk? Children learn to talk by hearing other people talk. They hear all the people all around them talk. This process of listening to other people talk starts from the day they are born. Their little brains are hard wired to take in sounds and words from the very beginning. Children, from babies to pre-schoolers, learn language from the people around them. They learn language from the people they spend the most time with. This is usually the parent. However, it can be siblings, grandparents, even nannies and day care workers. When children need some…

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Developmental Delay and Global Developmental Delay

By | Occupational Therapy, Speech Pathology

WHAT IS CHILD DEVELOPMENT? Child development is the order or sequence that children acquire skills as they grow and learn. Children follow a general pattern of development. We expect children to learn things within a particular time frame, and we expect this across all areas of development. The steps in each area of development are called developmental milestones. Each developmental milestone has an age range that we expect the child to develop the skill in: Children usually start using their first word between 12-16 months They should start walking between 12-18 months We are looking for them to use toys in pretend play between…

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Our Speech Pathology clinic in Bondi Junction

By | Speech Pathology

The first three years of a child’s life are critical for development. This is when they develop communication, motor skills and cognition. The brain makes enormous developments during this period that lead to these skills. However, some children don’t develop these skills at the same rate or in the same way as their peers. Some young children take longer to develop, some develop these skills poorly, and some children have associated conditions that impact on these areas. Children need Speech Pathology when don’t develop their communication skills early in life. Speech Pathology early on in life, can positively impact a…

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What is language delay in young children?

By | Speech Pathology

What is a  language delay? A language delay is a type of communication disorder. Your child may have a language delay if they don’t use language skills that would be expected for child of their age. Their language abilities may be developing at a slower rate than most children’s. They may have trouble expressing themselves or understanding others. Language delays are quite common. Research suggests that up to 10% of children have a language delay. Are there different types of language delays? Language delays can be receptive expressive or a combination of both A receptive language delay is when your…

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How many words should my child be saying?

By | Speech Pathology

Parents often ask this question. In fact, it is one of the first questions parents ask our Speech Pathologists. Why do parents worry about it? The number of words that the child says is often the first clue that the child’s speech and language is not developing appropriately. Children vary in their speech and language development but we expect a certain number of words by a particular age. Some children use 5 words at 18 months, and other children use 200. It may surprise you to know, that both can be in the normal range. How many words do most…

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What is stuttering?

By | Speech Pathology

Stuttering is a speech disorder that affects the person’s ability to speak smoothly. People who stutter know what they want to say, but have trouble saying it because their speech fluency is interrupted by: Repeating sounds in words or phrases (e.g. ‘I I I I can do it’) Prolonging sounds in a word (e.g. ‘where’s my bbbbanana’?) Blocking; which is when no sounds come out when the person is trying to speak. People who stutter may also develop non-verbal movements associated with their stutter. This can include head movements, blinking, and facial grimacing. Causes of stuttering The exact cause of…

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